General Resources

REPEAT MALTREATMENT IN ALASKA: POTENTIAL RESEARCH PATHWAYS

Diwakar K. Vadapalli, Ph.D.
Institute of Social and Economic Research
University of Alaska Anchorage

The Institute of Social and Economic Research at UAA, with the support of Alaska Children’s Trust, conducted a study looking at repeat maltreatment of Alaska youth to challenge the prevalent definition of repeat maltreatment and asses it more broadly to provide additional information for policymakers and other Alaskans working to better protect children. Some of the findings were:

  • The most appropriate period of time to use for assessing repeat maltreatment varies, depending on the purpose of the assessment.

  • Children reported more than once as victims of maltreatment account for more than two-thirds of all OCS investigations.

  • Using all OCS investigations as a measure of repeat maltreatment shows a higher rate than using just substantiated investigations.

  • Maltreatment starts very young among children who are repeatedly abused or neglected, with more than 40% of the victims first abused when they are less than a year old. \

  • Victims of repeat maltreatment in Alaska are about equally likely to be girls or boys, whether measured through total investigations or substantiated cases.

  • Neglect is by far the most common kind of reported maltreatment, accounting for about 75% of all reports OCS gets.

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ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EARLY CARE AND LEARNING IN ALASKA
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The purpose of this study was to assess the economic impacts of early care and learning services in Alaska. This study details the economic benefits of the sector as a source of employment and income. It also considers the role of early care and learning services in providing opportunities for parents to join Alaska’s workforce and earn income. Finally, the report describes the long-term economic and other societal benefits of high-quality early care and learning services, as documented by research conducted elsewhere in the nation

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